Motherhood Thoughts

 

Motherhood is more than a status of having a child. Motherhood is a process of personal growth in its own. It takes us into a world of emotions we never knew before.

Let me share with you some thoughts from mothers we had gotten the opportunity to chat with about the fulfillment, challenges, joys and fears of motherhood.

I had a conversation with my friend Alina, a mother of an adorable 2-year old boy who is turning 3 next month.

Being a mother is so much more than 9 months of pregnancy, going through labor, giving birth, and providing for your child. Being a mother is a mental and emotional state in which you wake up 15 times each night, 5 times to check whether they’re properly tucked in, 5 times to check whether they have fever (or breathing), and the other 5 times to fulfill every strangely inconceivable demand they have. And in between the waking-up-going-back-to-sleep cycle, you feel the angst that you perhaps are not properly taking care of your child!”

Here are the thoughts of Melissa, mother of a 12-year old boy:

I have often wondered if my child is with the right circle of friends in school, or if he is not being bullied, or if he is not going through that awkward stage of ‘trying to belong.’ I worry, if at the end of the day, he would come home with bruises, broken arm, or sprained ankle from his sports or from a fight. I wonder if he would still be comfortable trusting me with his feelings, his fears, his uncertainties of teenage years. Raising a teenager is a complex balance between discipline and allowing freedom. It’s like holding a watermelon seed between the thumb and pointer finger. Press it too tightly, it would shoot up and you would lose it. If you don’t hold it firm enough, it would fall and you would lose it just the same. How to find that balance…I don’t know. I still worry if I am raising him the right way…”

Here’s Crystal, a mother of an 18-year old daughter:

“You may not need to wake up every night just to check on whether they are tucked-in properly, or if they have fever. But I can tell you that you will experience an ongoing dilemma about their future, their personal choices, the path they will pursue in life, the people they will trust with their heart…. It is such a difficult process of “letting go” of worries, which a mother may never learn at all. This never ending worry will definitely leave you with sleepless nights and restless days… And no matter what you do, the feeling of angst whether you’ve been a good parent or not, never really goes away…”

 

By: Donna Costa, UC Baby Marketing